Category Archives: PyXLL

5 Simple Steps to Create a Real-Time Twitter Feed in Excel using Python and PyXLL

PyXLL 3.0 introduced a new, simpler, way of streaming real time data to Excel from Python.

Excel has had support for real time data (RTD) for a long time, but it requires a certain knowledge of COM to get it to work. With the new RTD features in PyXLL 3.0 it is now a lot simpler to get streaming data into Excel without having to write any COM code.

This blog will show how to build a simple real time data feed from Twitter in Python using the tweepy package, and then show how to stream that data into Excel using PyXLL.

(Note: The code from this blog is available on github https://github.com/pyxll/pyxll-examples/tree/master/twitter). 

Create a real-time Twitter data feed using Python and PyXLL.

Create a real-time Twitter feed in Excel using Python and PyXLL.

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Just Released: PyXLL v 3.0 (Python in Excel). New Real Time Data Stream Capabilities, Excel Ribbon Integration, and More.

Download a free 30 day trial of PyXLL and try it with your own data.

Since PyXLL was first released back in 2010 it has grown hugely in popularity and is used by businesses in many different sectors.

The original motivation for PyXLL was to be able to use all the best bits of Excel combined with a modern programming language for scientific computing, in a way that fits naturally and works seamlessly.

Since the beginning, PyXLL development focused on the things that really matter for creating useful real-world spreadsheets; worksheet functions and macro functions. Without these all you can do is just drive Excel by poking numbers in and reading numbers out. At the time the first version of PyXLL was released, that was already possibly using COM, and so providing yet another API to do the same was seen as little value add. On the other hand, being able to write functions and macros in Python opens up possibilities that previously were only available in VBA or writing complicated Excel Addins in C++ or C#.

With the release of PyXLL 3, integrating your Python code into Excel has become more enjoyable than ever. Many things have been simplified to get you up and running faster, and there are some major new features to explore.

  • If you are new to PyXLL have a look at the Getting Started section of the documentation.
  • All the features of PyXLL, including these new ones, can be found in the Documentation

NEW FEATURES IN PYXLL V. 3.0

1. Ribbon Customization

Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 15.57.12

Ever wanted to write an add-in that uses the Excel ribbon interface? Previously the only way to do this was to write a COM add-in, which requires a lot of knowledge, skill and perseverance! Now you can do it with PyXLL by defining your ribbon as an XML document and adding it to your PyXLL config. All the callbacks between Excel and your Python code are handled for you.

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Plotting in Excel with PyXLL and Matplotlib

Author: Tony Roberts, creator of PyXLL, a Python library that makes it possible to write add-ins for Microsoft Excel in Python. Download a FREE 30 day trial of PyXLL here.


Plotting in Excel with PyXLL and MatplotlibPython has a broad range of tools for data analysis and visualization. While Excel is able to produce various types of plots, sometimes it’s either not quite good enough or it’s just preferable to use matplotlib.

Users already familiar with matplotlib will be aware that when showing a plot as part of a Python script the script stops while a plot is shown and continues once the user has closed it. When doing the same in an IPython console when a plot is shown control returns to the IPython prompt immediately, which is useful for interactive development.

Something that has been asked a couple of times is how to use matplotlib within Excel using PyXLL. As matplotlib is just a Python package like any other it can be imported and used in the same way as from any Python script. The difficulty is that when showing a plot the call to matplotlib blocks and so control isn’t returned to Excel until the user closes the window.

This blog shows how to plot data from Excel using matplotlib and PyXLL so that Excel can continue to be used while a plot window is active, and so that same window can be updated whenever the data in Excel is updated. Continue reading

PyXLL: Deploy Python to Excel Easily

PyXLL Solution Home | Buy PyXLL | Press Release

Today Enthought announced that it is now the worldwide distributor for PyXLL, and we’re excited to offer this key product for deploying Python models, algorithms and code to Excel. Technical teams can use the full power of Enthought Canopy, or another Python distro, and end-users can access the results in their familiar Excel environment. And it’s straightforward to set up and use.

Installing PyXLL from Enthought Canopy

PyXLL is available as a package subscription (with significant discounts for multiple users). Once you’ve purchased a subscription you can easily install it via Canopy’s Package Manager as shown in the screenshots below (note that at this time PyXLL is only available for Windows users). The rest of the configuration instructions are in the Quick Start portion of the documentation. PyXLL itself is a plug-in to Excel. When you start Excel, PyXLL loads into Excel and reads in Python modules that you have created for PyXLL. This makes PyXLL especially useful for organizations that want to manage their code centrally and deploy to multiple Excel users.

Enthought Canopy Package Manager   Install PyXLL from Enthought Canopy's Package Manager

Creating Excel Functions with PyXLL

To create a PyXLL Python Excel function, you use the @xl_func decorator to tell PyXLL the following function should be registered with Excel, what its argument types are, and optionally what its return type is. PyXLL also reads the function’s docstring and provides that in the Excel function description. As an example, I created a module my_pyxll_module.py and registered it with PyXLL via the Continue reading

Avoiding “Excel Hell!” using a Python-based Toolchain

Update (Feb 6, 2014):  Enthought is now the exclusive distributor of PyXLL, a solution that helps users avoid “Excel Hell” by making it easy to develop add-ins for Excel in Python. Learn more here.

Didrik Pinte gave an informative, provocatively-titled presentation at the second, in-person New York Quantitative Python User’s Group (NY QPUG) meeting earlier this month.

There are a lot of examples in the press of Excel workflow mess-ups and spreadsheet errors contributing to some eye-popping mishaps in the finance world (e.g. JP Morgan’s spreadsheet issues may have led to the 2012 massive loss at “the London Whale”). Most of these can be traced to similar fundamental issues:

  • Data referencing/traceability

  • Numerical errors

  • Error-prone manual operations (cut & paste, …)

  • Tracing IO’s in libraries/API’s

  • Missing version control

  • Toolchain that doesn’t meet the needs of researchers, analysts, IT, etc.

Python, the coding language and its tool ecosystem, can provide a nice solution to these challenges, and many organizations are already turning to Python-based workflows in response. And with integration tools like PyXLL (to execute Python functions within Excel) and others, organizations can adopt Python-based workflows incrementally and start improving their current “Excel Hell” situation quickly.

For the details check out the video of Didrik’s NY QPUG presentation.  He demonstrates a an example solution using PyXLL and Enthought Canopy.

[vimeo 67327735 http://vimeo.com/67327735]

And grab the PDF of his slides here.

QPUG_20130514_ExcelHell_Slides

It would be great to hear your stories about “Excel Hell”. Let us know below.

–Brett Murphy