Category Archives: General

SciPy 2017 Conference to Showcase Leading Edge Developments in Scientific Computing with Python

Renowned scientists, engineers and researchers from around the world to gather July 10-16, 2017 in Austin, TX to share and collaborate to advance scientific computing tool


AUSTIN, TX – June 6, 2017 –
Enthought, as Institutional Sponsor, today announced the SciPy 2017 Conference will be held July 10-16, 2017 in Austin, Texas. At this 16th annual installment of the conference, scientists, engineers, data scientists and researchers will participate in tutorials, talks and developer sprints designed to foster the continued rapid growth of the scientific Python ecosystem. This year’s attendees hail from over 25 countries and represent academia, government, national research laboratories, and industries such as aerospace, biotechnology, finance, oil and gas and more.

“Since 2001, the SciPy Conference has been a highly anticipated annual event for the scientific and analytic computing community,” states Dr. Eric Jones, CEO at Enthought and SciPy Conference co-founder. “Over the last 16 years we’ve witnessed Python emerge as the de facto open source programming language for science, engineering and analytics with widespread adoption in research and industry. The powerful tools and libraries the SciPy community has developed are used by millions of people to advance scientific inquest and innovation every day.”

Special topical themes for this year’s conference are “Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Applications” and the “Scientific Python (SciPy) Tool Stack.” Keynote speakers include:

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Enthought at National Instruments’ NIWeek 2017: An Inside Look

This week I had the distinct privilege of representing Enthought at National Instruments‘ 23rd annual user conference, NIWeek 2017. National Instruments is a leader in test, measurement, and control solutions, and we share many common customers among our global scientific and engineering user base.

NIWeek kicked off on Monday with Alliance Day, where my colleague Andrew Collette and I went on stage to receive the LabVIEW Tools Network 2017 Product of the Year Award for Enthought’s Python Integration Toolkit, which provides a bridge between Python and LabVIEW, allowing you to create VI’s (virtual instruments) that make Python function and object method calls. Since its release last year, the Python Integration Toolkit has opened up access to a broad range of new capabilities for LabVIEW users,  by combining the best of Python with the best of LabVIEW. It was also inspiring to hear about the advances being made by other National Instruments partners. Congratulations to the award winners in other categories (Wineman Technology, Bloomy, and Moore Good Ideas)!

On Wednesday, Andrew gave a presentation titled “Building and Deploying Python-Powered LabVIEW Applications” to a standing-room only crowd.  He gave some background on the relative strengths of Python and LabVIEW (some of which is covered in our March 2017 webinar “Using Python and LabVIEW to Rapidly Solve Engineering Problems“) and then showcased some of the capabilities provided by the toolkit, such as plotting data acquisition results live to a web server using plotly, which is always a crowd-pleaser (you can learn more about that in the blog post “Using Plotly from LabVIEW via Python”).  Other demos included making use of the Python scikit-learn library for machine learning, (you can see Enthought’s CEO Eric Jones run that demo here, during the 2016 NIWeek keynotes.)

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Handling Missing Values in Pandas DataFrames: the Hard Way, and the Easy Way

The Data Import Tool can highlight missing value cells, helping you easily identify columns or rows containing NaN valuesThis is the second blog in a series. See the first blog here: Loading Data Into a Pandas DataFrame: The Hard Way, and The Easy Way

No dataset is perfect and most datasets that we have to deal with on a day-to-day basis have values missing, often represented by “NA” or “NaN”. One of the reasons why the Pandas library is as popular as it is in the data science community is because of its capabilities in handling data that contains NaN values.

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Webinar- Get More From Your Core: Applying Artificial Intelligence to CT, Photo, and Well Log Analysis with Virtual Core

What: Presentation, demo, and Q&A with Brendon Hall, Geoscience Product Manager, Enthought

Who should watch this webinar:

  • Oil and gas industry professionals who are looking for ways to extract more value from expensive science wells
  • Those interested in learning how artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques can be applied to core analysis

VIEW 


Geoscientists and petroleum engineers rely on accurate core measurements to characterize reservoirs, develop drilling plans and de-risk play assessments. Whole-core CT scans are now routinely performed on extracted well cores, however the data produced from these scans are difficult to visualize and integrate with other measurements.

Virtual Core automates aspects of core description for geologists, drastically reducing the time and effort required for core description, and its unified visualization interface displays cleansed whole-core CT data alongside core photographs and well logs. It provides tools for geoscientists to analyze core data and extract features from sub-millimeter scale to the entire core.

In this webinar and demo, we’ll start by introducing the Clear Core processing pipeline, which automatically removes unwanted artifacts (such as tubing) from the CT image. We’ll then show how the machine learning capabilities in Virtual Core can be used to describe the core, extracting features such as bedding planes and dip angle. Finally, we’ll show how the data can be viewed and analyzed alongside other core data, such as photographs, wellbore images, well logs, plug measurements, and more.

What You’ll Learn:

  • How core CT data, photographs, well logs, borehole images, and more can be integrated into a digital core workshop
  • How digital core data can shorten core description timelines and deliver business results faster
  • How new features can be extracted from digital core data using artificial intelligence
  • Novel workflows that leverage these features, such as identifying parasequences and strategies for determining net pay

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Presenter:

Brendon Hall, Geoscience Applications Engineer, Enthought Brendon Hall, Enthought
Geoscience Product Manager and Application Engineer

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Enthought Presents the Canopy Platform at the 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Spring Meeting

by: Tim Diller, Product Manager and Scientific Software Developer, Enthought

Last week I attended the AIChE (American Institute of Chemical Engineers) Spring Meeting in San Antonio, Texas. It was a great time of year to visit this cultural gem deep in the heart of Texas (and just down the road from our Austin offices), with plenty of good food, sights and sounds to take in on top of the conference and its sessions.

The AIChE Spring Meeting focuses on applications of chemical engineering in industry, and Enthought was invited to present a poster and deliver a “vendor perspective” talk on the Canopy Platform for Process Monitoring and Optimization as part of the “Big Data Analytics” track. This was my first time at AIChE, so some of the names were new, but in a lot of ways it felt very similar to many other engineering conferences I have participated in over the years (for instance, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers), etc.).

This event underscored that regardless of industry, engineers are bringing the same kinds of practical ingenuity to bear on similar kinds of problems, and with the cost of data acquisition and storage plummeting in the last decade, many engineers are now sitting on more data than they know how to effectively handle.

What exactly is “big data”? Does it really matter for solving hard engineering problems?

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Webinar: Using Python and LabVIEW Together to Rapidly Solve Engineering Problems

What: Presentation, demo, and Q&A with Collin Draughon, Software Product Manager, National Instruments, and Andrew Collette, Scientific Software Developer, Enthought

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Engineers and scientists all over the world are using Python and LabVIEW to solve hard problems in manufacturing and test automation, by taking advantage of the vast ecosystem of Python software.  But going from an engineer’s proof-of-concept to a stable, production-ready version of Python, smoothly integrated with LabVIEW, has long been elusive.

In this on-demand webinar and demo, we take a LabVIEW data acquisition app and extend it with Python’s machine learning capabilities, to automatically detect and classify equipment vibration.  Using a modern Python platform and the Python Integration Toolkit for LabVIEW, we show how easy and fast it is to install heavy-hitting Python analysis libraries, take advantage of them from live LabVIEW code, and finally deploy the entire solution, Python included, using LabVIEW Application Builder.


Python_LabVIEW_VI_Diagram

In this webinar, you’ll see how easy it is to solve an engineering problem by using LabVIEW and Python together.

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Webinar – Python for Professionals: The Complete Guide to Enthought’s Technical Training Courses

View the Python for Professionals Webinar

What: Presentation and Q&A with Dr. Michael Connell, VP, Enthought Training Solutions
Who Should Watch: Anyone who wants to develop proficiency in Python for scientific, engineering, analytic, quantitative, or data science applications, including team leaders considering Python training for a group, learning and development coordinators supporting technical teams, or individuals who want to develop their Python skills for professional applications

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Scientists Use Enthought’s Virtual Core Software to Study Asteroid Impact

Chicxulub Impact Crater Expedition Recovers Core to Further Discovery on the Impact on Life and the Historical Dinosaur Extinction

From April to May 2016, a team of international scientists drilled into the site of an asteroid impact, known as the Chicxulub Impact Crater, which occurred 66 million years ago. The crater is buried several hundred meters below the surface in the Yucatán region of Mexico. Until that time, dinosaurs and marine reptiles dominated the world, but the series of catastrophic events that followed the impact caused the extinction of all large animals, leading to the rise of mammals and evolution of mankind. This joint expedition, organized by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) recovered a nearly complete set of rock cores from 506 to 1335 meters below the modern day seafloor.  These cores are now being studied in detail by an international team of scientists to understand the effects of the impact on life and as a case study of how impacts affect planets.

CT Scans of Cores Provide Deeper Insight Into Core Description and Analysis

Before being shipped to Germany (where the onshore science party took place from September to October 2016), the cores were sent to Houston, TX for CT scanning and imaging. The scanning was done at Weatherford Labs, who performed a high resolution dual energy scan on the entire core.  Dual energy scanning utilizes x-rays at two different energy levels. This provides the information necessary to calculate the bulk density and effective atomic numbers of the core. Enthought processed the raw CT data, and provided cleaned CT data along with density and effective atomic number images.  The expedition scientists were able to use these images to assist with core description and analysis.

CT Scans of Chicxulub Crater Core Samples

Digital images of the CT scans of the recovered core are displayed side by side with the physical cores for analysis

chicxulub-virtual-core-scan-core-detail

Information not evident in physical observation (bottom, core photograph) can be observed in CT scans (top)

These images are helping scientists understand the processes that occurred during the impact, how the rock was damaged, and how the properties of the rock were affected.  From analysis of images, well log data and laboratory tests it appears that the impact had a permanent effect on rock properties such as density, and the shattered granite in the core is yielding new insights into the mechanics of large impacts.

Virtual Core Provides Co-Visualization of CT Data with Well Log Data, Borehole Images, and Line Scan Photographs for Detailed Interrogation

Enthought’s Virtual Core software was used by the expedition scientists to integrate the CT data along with well log data, borehole images and line scan photographs.  This gave the scientists access to high resolution 2D and 3D images of the core, and allowed them to quickly interrogate regions in more detail when questions arose. Virtual Core also provides machine learning feature detection intelligence and visualization capabilities for detailed insight into the composition and structure of the core, which has proved to be a valuable tool both during the onshore science party and ongoing studies of the Chicxulub core.

chicxulub-virtual-core-digital-co-visualization

Enthought’s Virtual Core software was used by the expedition scientists to visualize the CT data alongside well log data, borehole images and line scan photographs.

Related Articles

Drilling to Doomsday
Discover Magazine, October 27, 2016

Chicxulub ‘dinosaur crater’ investigation begins in earnest
BBC News, October 11, 2016

How CT scans help Chicxulub Crater scientists
Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Chicxulub Impact Crater Expedition Blog, October 3, 2016

Chicxulub ‘dinosaur’ crater drill project declared a success
BBC Science, May 25, 2016

Scientists hit pay dirt in drilling of dinosaur-killing impact crater
Science Magazine, May 3, 2016

Scientists gear up to drill into ‘ground zero’ of the impact that killed the dinosaurs
Science Magazine, March 3, 2016

Texas scientists probe crater they think led to dinosaur doomsday
Austin American-Statesman, June 2, 2016