Traits and TraitsUI: Reactive User Interfaces for Rapid Application Development in Python

 The open-source pi3Diamond application built with Traits, TraitsUI and Chaco by Swabian Instruments.The Enthought Tool Suite team is pleased to announce the release of Traits 4.6. Together with the release of TraitsUI 5.1 last year, these core packages of Enthought’s open-source rapid application development tools are now compatible with Python 3 as well as Python 2.7.  Long-time fans of Enthought’s open-source offerings will be happy to hear about the recent updates and modernization we’ve been working on, including the recent release of Mayavi 4.5 with Python 3 support, while newcomers to Python will be pleased that there is an easy way to get started with GUI programming which grows to allow you to build applications with sophisticated, interactive 2D and 3D visualizations.

A Brief Introduction to Traits and TraitsUI

Traits is a mature reactive programming library for Python that allows application code to respond to changes on Python objects, greatly simplifying the logic of an application.  TraitsUI is a tool for building desktop applications on top of the Qt or WxWidgets cross-platform GUI toolkits. Traits, together with TraitsUI, provides a programming model for Python that is similar in concept to modern and popular Javascript frameworks like React, Vue and Angular but targeting desktop applications rather than the browser.

Continue reading

New Year, New Enthought Products!

We’ve had a number of major product development efforts underway over the last year, and we’re pleased to share a lot of new announcements for 2017:

A New Chapter for the Enthought Python Distribution (EPD):
Python 3 and Intel MKL 2017

In 2004, Enthought released the first “Python: Enthought Edition,” a Python package distribution tailored for a scientific and analytic audience. In 2008 this became the Enthought Python Distribution (EPD), a self-contained installer with the "enpkg" command-line tool to update and manage packages. Since then, over a million users have benefited from Enthought’s tested, pre-compiled set of Python packages, allowing them to focus on their science by eliminating the hassle of setting up tools.

Enthought Python Distribution logo

Fast forward to 2017, and we now offer over 450 Python packages and a new era for the Enthought Python Distributionaccess to all of the packages in the new EPD is completely free to all users and includes packages and runtimes for both Python 2 and Python 3 with some exciting new additions. Our ever-growing list of packages includes, for example, the 2017 release of the MKL (Math Kernel Library), the fruit of an ongoing collaboration with Intel.

The New Enthought Deployment Server:
Secure, Onsite Access to EPD and Private Packages

enthought-deployment-server-centralized-management-illustration-v2

Continue reading

Webinar: An Exclusive Peek “Under the Hood” of Enthought Training and the Pandas Mastery Workshop

See the webinar

Enthought’s Pandas Mastery Workshop is designed to accelerate the development of skill and confidence with Python’s Pandas data analysis package — in just three days, you’ll look like an old pro! This course was created ground up by our training experts based on insights from the science of human learning, as well as what we’ve learned from over a decade of extensive practical experience of teaching thousands of scientists, engineers, and analysts to use Python effectively in their everyday work.

In this webinar, we’ll give you the key information and insight you need to evaluate whether the Pandas Mastery Workshop is the right solution to advance your data analysis skills in Python, including:

  • Who will benefit most from the course
  • A guided tour through the course topics
  • What skills you’ll take away from the course, how the instructional design supports that
  • What the experience is like, and why it is different from other training alternatives (with a sneak peek at actual course materials)
  • What previous workshop attendees say about the course

See the Webinar

Continue reading

Loading Data Into a Pandas DataFrame: The Hard Way, and The Easy Way

This is the first blog in a series. See the second blog here: Handling Missing Values in Pandas DataFrames: the Hard Way, and the Easy Way

Importing files or data into Pandas with the Canopy Data Import ToolData exploration, manipulation, and visualization start with loading data, be it from files or from a URL. Pandas has become the go-to library for all things data analysis in Python, but if your intention is to jump straight into data exploration and manipulation, the Canopy Data Import Tool can help, instead of having to learn the details of programming with the Pandas library. Continue reading

Webinar: Solving Enterprise Python Deployment Headaches with the New Enthought Deployment Server

See a recording of the webinar:

Built on 15 years of experience of Python packaging and deployment for Fortune 500 companies, the NEW Enthought Deployment Server provides enterprise-grade tools groups and organizations using Python need, including:

  1. Secure, onsite access to a private copy of the proven 450+ package Enthought Python Distribution
  2. Centralized management and control of packages and Python installations
  3. Private repositories for sharing and deployment of proprietary Python packages
  4. Support for the software development workflow with Continuous Integration and development, testing, and production repositories

In this webinar, Enthought’s product team demonstrates the key features of the Enthought Deployment Server and how it can take the pain out of Python deployment and management at your organization.

Continue reading

Using the Canopy Data Import Tool to Speed Cleaning and Transformation of Data & New Release Features

Enthought Canopy Data Import Tool

Download Canopy to try the Data Import Tool

In November 2016, we released Version 1.0.6 of the Data Import Tool (DIT), an addition to the Canopy data analysis environment. With the Data Import Tool, you can quickly import structured data files as Pandas DataFrames, clean and manipulate the data using a graphical interface, and create reusable Python scripts to speed future data wrangling.

For example, the Data Import Tool lets you delete rows and columns containing Null values or replace the Null values in the DataFrame with a specific value. It also allows you to create new columns from existing ones. All operations are logged and are reversible in the Data Import Tool so you can experiment with various workflows with safeguards against errors or forgetting steps. Continue reading

Scientists Use Enthought’s Virtual Core Software to Study Asteroid Impact

Chicxulub Impact Crater Expedition Recovers Core to Further Discovery on the Impact on Life and the Historical Dinosaur Extinction

From April to May 2016, a team of international scientists drilled into the site of an asteroid impact, known as the Chicxulub Impact Crater, which occurred 66 million years ago. The crater is buried several hundred meters below the surface in the Yucatán region of Mexico. Until that time, dinosaurs and marine reptiles dominated the world, but the series of catastrophic events that followed the impact caused the extinction of all large animals, leading to the rise of mammals and evolution of mankind. This joint expedition, organized by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) recovered a nearly complete set of rock cores from 506 to 1335 meters below the modern day seafloor.  These cores are now being studied in detail by an international team of scientists to understand the effects of the impact on life and as a case study of how impacts affect planets.

CT Scans of Cores Provide Deeper Insight Into Core Description and Analysis

Before being shipped to Germany (where the onshore science party took place from September to October 2016), the cores were sent to Houston, TX for CT scanning and imaging. The scanning was done at Weatherford Labs, who performed a high resolution dual energy scan on the entire core.  Dual energy scanning utilizes x-rays at two different energy levels. This provides the information necessary to calculate the bulk density and effective atomic numbers of the core. Enthought processed the raw CT data, and provided cleaned CT data along with density and effective atomic number images.  The expedition scientists were able to use these images to assist with core description and analysis.

CT Scans of Chicxulub Crater Core Samples

Digital images of the CT scans of the recovered core are displayed side by side with the physical cores for analysis

chicxulub-virtual-core-scan-core-detail

Information not evident in physical observation (bottom, core photograph) can be observed in CT scans (top)

These images are helping scientists understand the processes that occurred during the impact, how the rock was damaged, and how the properties of the rock were affected.  From analysis of images, well log data and laboratory tests it appears that the impact had a permanent effect on rock properties such as density, and the shattered granite in the core is yielding new insights into the mechanics of large impacts.

Virtual Core Provides Co-Visualization of CT Data with Well Log Data, Borehole Images, and Line Scan Photographs for Detailed Interrogation

Enthought’s Virtual Core software was used by the expedition scientists to integrate the CT data along with well log data, borehole images and line scan photographs.  This gave the scientists access to high resolution 2D and 3D images of the core, and allowed them to quickly interrogate regions in more detail when questions arose. Virtual Core also provides machine learning feature detection intelligence and visualization capabilities for detailed insight into the composition and structure of the core, which has proved to be a valuable tool both during the onshore science party and ongoing studies of the Chicxulub core.

chicxulub-virtual-core-digital-co-visualization

Enthought’s Virtual Core software was used by the expedition scientists to visualize the CT data alongside well log data, borehole images and line scan photographs.

Related Articles

Drilling to Doomsday
Discover Magazine, October 27, 2016

Chicxulub ‘dinosaur crater’ investigation begins in earnest
BBC News, October 11, 2016

How CT scans help Chicxulub Crater scientists
Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Chicxulub Impact Crater Expedition Blog, October 3, 2016

Chicxulub ‘dinosaur’ crater drill project declared a success
BBC Science, May 25, 2016

Scientists hit pay dirt in drilling of dinosaur-killing impact crater
Science Magazine, May 3, 2016

Scientists gear up to drill into ‘ground zero’ of the impact that killed the dinosaurs
Science Magazine, March 3, 2016

Texas scientists probe crater they think led to dinosaur doomsday
Austin American-Statesman, June 2, 2016

Mayavi (Python 3D Data Visualization and Plotting Library) adds major new features in recent release

Key updates include: Jupyter notebook integration, movie recording capabilities, time series animation, updated VTK compatibility, and Python 3 support

by Prabhu Ramachandran, core developer of Mayavi and director, Enthought India

The Mayavi development team is pleased to announce Mayavi 4.5.0, which is an important release both for new features and core functionality updates.

Mayavi is a general purpose, cross-platform Python package for interactive 2-D and 3-D scientific data visualization. Mayavi integrates seamlessly with NumPy (fast numeric computation library for Python) and provides a convenient Pythonic wrapper for the powerful VTK (Visualization Toolkit) library. Mayavi provides a standalone UI to help visualize data, and is easy to extend and embed in your own dialogs and UIs. For full information, please see the Mayavi documentation.

Mayavi is part of the Enthought Tool Suite of open source application development packages and is available to install through Enthought Canopy’s Package Manager (you can download Canopy here).

Mayavi 4.5.0 is an important release which adds the following features:

  1. Jupyter notebook support: Adds basic support for displaying Mayavi images or interactive X3D scenes
  2. Support for recording movies and animating time series
  3. Support for the new matplotlib color schemes
  4. Improvements on the experimental Python 3 support from the previous release
  5. Compatibility with VTK-5.x, VTK-6.x, and 7.x. For more details on the full set of changes see here.

Let’s take a look at some of these new features in more detail:

Jupyter Notebook Support

This feature is still basic and experimental, but it is convenient. The feature allows one to embed either a static PNG image of the scene or a richer X3D scene into a Jupyter notebook. To use this feature, one should first initialize the notebook with the following:

from mayavi import mlab
mlab.init_notebook()

Subsequently, one may simply do:

s = mlab.test_plot3d()
s

This will embed a 3-D visualization producing something like this:

Mayavi in a Jupyter Notebook

Embedded 3-D visualization in a Jupyter notebook using Mayavi

When the init_notebook method is called it configures the Mayavi objects so they can be rendered on the Jupyter notebook. By default the init_notebook function selects the X3D backend. This will require a network connection and also reasonable off-screen support. This currently will not work on a remote Linux/OS X server unless VTK has been built with off-screen support via OSMesa as discussed here.

For more documentation on the Jupyter support see here.

Animating Time Series

This feature makes it very easy to animate a time series. Let us say one has a set of files that constitute a time series (files of the form some_name[0-9]*.ext). If one were to load any file that is part of this time series like so:

from mayavi import mlab
src = mlab.pipeline.open('data_01.vti')

Animating these is now very easy if one simply does the following:

src.play = True

This can also be done on the UI. There is also a convenient option to synchronize multiple time series files using the “sync timestep” option on the UI or from Python. The screenshot below highlights the new features in action on the UI:

Time Series Animation in Mayavi

New time series animation feature in the Python Mayavi 3D visualization library.

Recording Movies

One can also create a movie (really a stack of images) while playing a time series or running any animation. On the UI, one can select a Mayavi scene and navigate to the movie tab and select the “record” checkbox. Any animations will then record screenshots of the scene. For example:

from mayavi import mlab
f = mlab.figure()
f.scene.movie_maker.record = True
mlab.test_contour3d_anim()

This will create a set of images, one for each step of the animation. A gif animation of these is shown below:

Recording movies with Mayavi

Recording movies as gif animations using Mayavi

More than 50 pull requests were merged since the last release. We are thankful to Prabhu Ramachandran, Ioannis Tziakos, Kit Choi, Stefano Borini, Gregory R. Lee, Patrick Snape, Ryan Pepper, SiggyF, and daytonb for their contributions towards this release.

Additional Resources on Mayavi: